40th International WAHVM Congress

The 40th International WAHVM Congress was held on August 22nd – 25th, 2012, in Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The Main Themes of the congress were “History of Veterinary Associations” and “History of the World Veterinary Association.”

For more information and a complete conference program, visit the congress website at http://www.veterinaryhistory.nl/

Click on the following links to read minutes from the General Assembly and from the Board and Liaison Meeting.

utrecht universityUtrecht’s ancient city center features many buildings and structures from the Early Middle Ages and the largest university in the Netherlands.

Our Congress is a unique experience: You will investigate the history of animals in health & disease, and their veterinary caregivers, with colleagues from 20+ different nations. You will enjoy gourmet dinners in historic venues such as University Hall (where the Treaty of Utrecht was signed in 1579) and cocktails in the Old Veterinary School (don’t miss the restaurant in the former rabies isolation building!)

Conference Overview

More than 120 people, representing 24 countries, registered for the 40th WAHVM Congress August 22-25, 2012. Organized around two themes–the history of veterinary associations and the history of the World Veterinary Association, the program also featured papers and a poster session on veterinary history in general.

These contributions were especially memorable: Johann Schäffer, “‘For Science and Philanthropy:’ Professional and Cultural Political Organization of Veterinarians in Germany, 1833-2012”; Julie Hipperson, “Vets First, Women Second?: The Society of Women Veterinary Surgeons in Britain, 1941-1990”; Veronika Goebel, “The Third Reich and the Munich Veterinary Faculty: Effects and Consequences for Students, Academic Staff, and Institutions”; Fernando Camarero Rioja and Joaquin Sanchez de Lollano Prieto, “Veterinary Movies Produced by the Spanish Ministry of Agriculture”; and Floor Haalboom, “Bacteria, Babies, Bovines and Birds”.

On Wednesday the congress got under way with a social hour at an historical landmark, the Institute of Veterinary Pathology; on Tuesday members attended a dinner at the Railway Museum in Utrecht; Friday they attended the splendid Congress dinner at the University of Utrecht’s Academy Building; and on Saturday registrants travelled by bus to the spectacular Dutch Open Air Museum at Arnhem, where they also dined.

Ontario Veterinary College: A Chronology, 1862-2012

During the Ontario Veterinary College Sesquicentennial, June 15, 2012, eight speakers, including veterinarians, laboratory scientists, and historians, focused on the theme, “Cross-Border Connections in Canadian & U. S. Veterinary History.” Along with the program, the following timeline of OVC’s history was presented.

1862

Andrew Smith begins lecturing on veterinary medicine in Toronto.

1866

First class graduated, Robert Robinson, William Elliot, and George Kempchell.

1883

Smith’s lecture notes are published as the first Canadian veterinary medical textbook.

1902

John Gunion Rutherford (OVC ‘1879) named Veterinary Director General of Canada becoming instrumental in creating federal meat inspection laws.

1910

Francis Schofield graduates and goes to Korea as a medical missionary, coming into conflict with Japanese occupiers. From 1921-55, he taught pathology at OVC, becoming renowned for linking a bleeding disease in sheep and cattle to moldy sweet clover. That research led to development of vitamin K inhibitors now used worldwide to control blood- clotting.

1910

Canadian Army Veterinary Corps is established with several OVC students and graduates serving in its ranks during the first World War.

1913

Omega Tau Sigma fraternity established at OVC.

1918

C. D. McGilvray appointed OVC Principal, playing a key role in OVC’s accreditation by the U. S. Bureau of Animal Industry and the American Veterinary Medical Association.

1922

OVC moves from Toronto to Guelph, Ontario.

1928

OVC graduates its first woman, Elizabeth Barrie.

 

Carpenter. Frank Côté (OVC ’26) begins teaching small-animal

medicine at OVC.

1932

Inter-class hockey (Challenge Cup) formalized with C. D. McGilvray gift.

1951

OVC Student Wives Auxiliary forms.

1951

OVC Alumni Association formed.

1953

Jack Côté (OVC ’51) begins farm service service at OVC.

1956

Donald Barnum and F. H. S. Newbould publish research on the use of antibiotics for treating bovine mastitis.

1958

James Archibald becomes head of the Small Animal Clinic and introduces aseptic conditions for all OVC surgeries.

1964

OVC becomes part of the newly-formed University of Guelph.

1986

OVC Pet Trust Fund is established to support applied clinical research, its first major achievement being the funding of the College’s first cobalt radiation unit.

1987

Patricia Shewen and Bruce Wilkie develop a vaccine for shipping fever, which became the most commercially successful patented veterinary medicine.

2006

Centre for Public Health and Zoonoses opens, providing research into diseases transmissible between animals and humans.

2007

Institute for Comparative Cancer Investigation (ICCI) opens.

2010

Hill’s Pet Nutrition Primary Healthcare Centre Opens.

 

Recent Articles

Recent articles relating to veterinary history:

Bruce Vivash Jones, “From Inns and Coffee Houses to Red Lion Square,” Veterinary Record, 2012, March 10, pages 250-2. A succinct but thorough account of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (London) during its first 100 years.

Philip M. Teigen, “The Global History of Rabies and the Historian’s Gaze,” Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 2012, 67:318-27. Among the books reviewed is Arthur King, et al., Historical Perspectives of Rabies in Europe and the Mediterranean Basin (Paris: OIE, 2004).

Stephen Fisher, “War Horses: The Real Story of Equines in the First World War,” Postcard World, 2012, 3(2): 6-8 and 3(3):6-8. Brief article but very important as a source for illustrations of WWI horses.

Sesquicentennial of the Ontario Veterinary College

On Friday June 15, about forty-five people gathered at the Ontario Veterinary College (OVC) in Guelph, Ontario, for a day-long historical program marking the 150th anniversary of the College’s founding.

Brian Derbyshire organized the day’s events, sponsored jointly by the OVC and the American Veterinary Medical History Society. ” Eight speakers, including veterinarians, laboratory scientists, and historians, focused on the theme, “Cross-Border Connections in Canadian & U. S. Veterinary History.”

Brian Derbyshire introduced the theme; Terry Crowley described 19th-century student life through the eyes of an American student; Dean Percy examined connections in pathology; Lisa Cox assayed bovine tuberculosis in Ontario and neighboring New York state; Elizabeth Stone examined the history of OVC women; John Prescott provided a biography of pathologist Frank Schofield; Phil Teigen examined the lives of two veterinarians trained in Canada who then established careers in Washington, DC; and Ian Barker concluded the day’s program with an account of the past present and future of the C. A. V. Barker Museum of Canadian Veterinary History. Helen and Zbigniew Wojcinski, graduates of OVC and now veterinary scientists in Michigan, ably moderated the entire program.

OVCSesquicentennial

Veterinary Heritage: Bulletin of the American Veterinary Medical History Society, 2011, Vol 34 (2)

 “Animals in Space: Reaching for the Stars,” Maite Torres.

“Pioneers of Canadian Veterinary Medicine,” Brian Derbyshire.

“The Emergence of Shelter Medicine in Veterinary Education: From Nonexistent to Necessary,” Bruce Willbrant.

“An Extinct Mesopotamian Lion Subspecies,” Hutan Ashrafian.

Complutensian Veterinary Museum – Madrid

ComplutenseMuseumThe Veterinary Faculty of Madrid University recently enlarged its museum by opening a visible storage facility and by updating the museum’s website. Holding more than 3,000 artifacts, the the Complutensian Veterinary Museum includes anatomical models in wood, plaster, wax, and papier-maché, as well as numerous scientific and veterinary instruments. The collection illustrates food inspection, public health, animal production, and veterinary practice.

18th Spanish National and Ninth Ibero-American History of Veterinary Medicine Congress

The 18th Spanish National and Ninth Ibero-American History of Veterinary Medicine Congress, will be held in SANTANDER (Spain), 4-6 October 2012, PALACIO DE LA MAGDALENA, Calle de la Familia Real.

For further details contact:

SECRETARÍA TÉCNICA
Colegio Veterinario de Cantabria
C/ Castilla, 39 Entlo. 39009 – Santander
Tel. 942.22.99.04 FAX. 942.36.04.56
E-mail: cantabria@colvet.es

Congress Program:

October 4

16.00 – Acreditación 16.30 – Inauguración por el Ayuntamiento.

17.00 – “SUEÑOS Y REALIDADES EN EL SANTANDER DE 1900. APUNTES HISTÓRICOS PARA UN CENTENARIO” – Celestina Losada Varea, Doctora en Historia

18.00 – “LOS CABALLOS DE GULLIVER” – Benito Madariaga, Doctor en Veterinaria, Académico y cronista de la ciudad de Santander.

19.00 – HISTORIA DEL INICIO DE LA VETERINARIA EN ECUADOR: 78 AÑOS DE VIGENCIA. Dr. José Manuel Aguilar Reyes. Universidad de Quevedo (Ecuador).

20.00 – Recepción y visita en el Palacio de la Magdalena

October 5

9.30 – Acreditación

10.00 –”ALEJANDRO MAGNO Y EL VIRUS DEL WEST NILE: RESOLVIENDO EL GRAN MISTERIO MÉDICO DE LA HISTORIA” – Santiago Vega García, Universidad CEU Cardenal Herrera Oria (Valencia)

11.00 – “LA CONFIGURACIÓN DE LA VETERINARIA DECIMONÓNICA FRENTE A LA ALBEITERÍA: UN PROCESO LLENO DE CONFLICTOS, Y NO EL DESARROLLO DE UNA ESENCIA” – José Manuel Gutiérrez, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona

Pausa-Café

12.30 – “VIDA Y OBRA DE DON JUAN SUÁREZ DE PERALTA. CRONISTA Y PROTOALBÉYTAR DE AMÉRICA” – Miguel Márquez, Universidad Autónoma de México

14.00 – Comida de trabajo

16.00 – “REVISITER LE LIVRE D’ABÛ BEKR IBN BEDR AL BAYTÂR : LE NÂCÉRI” -Dr. Jamal Hossaini-Hilali. Universidad de Rabat (Marruecos).

17.00 – Comunicaciones. Pausa-Café

18.30 – Asamblea de la AEHV.

October 6

10.00- Ponencia – (Rafael Perez del Álamo, veterinario de Loja)

11.30- Comunicación Especial – “LA EMIGRACIÓN COMO SALIDA PROFESIONAL DURANTE LA PLÉTORA DE LA DÉCADA DE LOS CINCUENTA”- Ángel Martínez Roiz –

12.00- Comunicaciones. 13.30- Paseo en barco por la bahía de Santander.

 

Veterinary History, August 2012

Veterinary History, Vol. 16(3), was published in August, 2012.  

“An African Story (Editorial),” Bruce V. Jones

“Autobiography (6)” James Beart Simonds

“Early Teaching of the Veterinary Art and Science in Edinburgh,” Alastair A. Macdonald and Colin M. Warwick

“A Previously Unrecorded Copy of The Gentleman’s Pocket-Farrier,” John Clewlow

Four Veterinary Corps Officers: Their Contribution in the Context of Their Times,” G.R. Durran

“Connie May Ford, MBE, MRCVS, 1912-1998,” G. Francis Clegg

The Crescent York: Reminiscences of Four Assistants in their First Practice,” F.T.W. Jordan, G. Grant, M. Collins and A.D. Weaver

“Feeding the Ancient Horse,” Thomas Donaghy

“Old Time Farriery Writers: Snape, Sainbel and Blaine,” G.E. Fussell

“Richard David Locke BVSc, DVSM, MRCVS (Obituary),” Jean Mann

“From Green Monkeys and Baboons: The Story of the RCVS Museum,” Clare Boulton

The Horse from Arabia to the Royal Ascot – At the British Museum

Fragment of a carved relief featuring three horses drawing a chariot. From the north-west palace, Nimrud, Assyria (modern-day Iraq). Neo-Assyrian, 9th century BC. – British Museum

Louise Curth recently reviewed the British Museum exhibition, “The Horse from Arabia to Royal Ascot” for BBC Radio. Listen to her discussion with Donna Landry about how the iconography of the horse has been represented in art and culture.  This free-admission exhibition, running until the 30 September 2012, surveys 5,000 years of horse history.