2016 Young Scholars Award

The WAHVM Board is pleased to announce the results of the 2016 WAHVM Young Scholars Award. This year, we received 14 entries and the standard was extremely high. Many congratulations to the three prize winners:

1) Karl Bruno, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences: ‘Practical Training for Modern Practitioners: Nils Lagerlöf, India, and Early Swedish Development Aid at the Veterinary College’

2) Kit Heintzman, Harvard University. ‘A cabinet of the ordinary: Domesticating veterinary medicine’

3) Julie Hipperson, Kings College London. “While a tear is in the eye’: women and the gendered business of small animal practice in interwar Britain’

42nd International Congress – Vienna – Update #3

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The 42nd Congress of the World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine (WAHVM) will be held at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna July 27th to July 30th, 2016. The congress will be a joint conference with the European Association of Veterinary Anatomists (EAVA).  The full congress website is here.

Abstract submission and registration began on January 13, 2016. For registration please follow the link published on the conference homepage (Registration). You can also find detailed information on abstract formats and templates to work on (Abstracts).

Abstracts will be accepted until March 11, 2016.  Early registration is open from January 13 until May 13, 2016.  Late registration will remain open until July 22, and onsite registration is also available, but these are progressively more expensive.  See the registration link above for the full schedule of registration fees.

For those who have to apply for scholarships or other external funding, it might be of importance to know the expected time of decisions on abstract acceptance. The organizing committee aims at delivering the decision to the authors between April 25 and April 29, 2016.

Please make sure that your membership fees for 2016 have been transferred to the respective society in advance (final deadline for EAVA-memberships is January 31, 2016)  – so you can register as member in good standing and pay the reduced fees.

2016 Young Scholars Award Competition

The Young Scholars Award recognizes the best original essay on any topic of relevance to the history of the veterinary field.

First Prize: 1000 Euro plus up to 1000 Euro expenses to present the paper at the WAHVM biennial Congress in Vienna, 27-30 July 2016*

Second Prize: 400 Euro

Third Prize: 200 Euro

*All prizes will be awarded at the Vienna congress. The first prize winner must attend and present the paper to collect the prize money.

For application and submission details, please download this pdf.

 

42nd International Congress – Vienna – Updated

ViennaConference

The 42nd Congress of the World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine (WAHVM) will be held at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna July 27th to July 30th, 2016. The congress will be a joint conference with the European Association of Veterinary Anatomists (EAVA).

The main topics of the congress in veterinary history will be:

  • History of Animal Anatomy
  • History of Early Veterinary Schools

More information is now available, including the time line of registration, registration fees, a preliminary programme and information on the social programme at: http://www.vetmeduni.ac.at/de/eava-wahvm-2016/

Hannover History Section of the German Veterinary Medical Society – 18th Annual Conference and Methodology Seminar

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During the 61st Annual DVG-Vet-Kongress in Berlin 12-15 of November 2015 there will also be a conference in veterinary history. The history conference is arranged by the History Section of the German Veterinary Medical Society and the Department of History of the University of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover and takes place 13 and 14 of November at Estrel Convention Center. There will also be a Methodology Seminar during the conference.

Two main themes have been chosen: “Role and importance of veterinary medicine in society” andSilent witnesses: Veterinary medicine and museology.” 

The cover picture of the Call for Papers depicts a synthesis of both themes: “La folie du Jour!”, ‘The madness of the day!’ is the title given to this empire engraving housed in the Veterinary Historical Museum of the University of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover. The caricature shows physicians who presumably after giving an enema to the lady of the house also give her lapdog an enema, a satire on veterinary medicine, which was emerging at the beginning of the 19th century.

Download the full seminar announcement or visit www.csm-congress.de for more information or to register. Professor Johann Schäffer is responsible for scientific supervision.

41st International Congress London

wahvm reception royal veterinary collegeThe Biennial Congress of the World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine, hosted by the Veterinary History Society was held at Imperial College London, 10-13 September 2014.

This event, held for the first time in Britain, welcomed speakers from 30 countries to address the twin themes of ‘One Health‘ (connections between human and animal medicine) and ‘War, animals and the veterinary profession.’ There were also sessions on veterinary collections, general veterinary history and oral history.

Key notes were delivered by Professor Donald F. Smith, Professor of Surgery and Dean Emeritus at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine (‘History of One Health’), and Dr Hilda Keane, Ruskin College, Oxford (‘War, Animals and the Veterinary Profession’), who also led a walk on ‘Animal pasts in Hyde Park.’

There was a reception at the Royal Veterinary College, Camden, and a conference dinner at King’s College London.

The congress timetable can be viewed here and there is also a report of the event.

A photo slideshow from the congress can be viewed here through the Veterinary History Society.

You can also download the General Assembly minutes and the Advisory Board minutes from the meeting.

41st WAHVM Congress – Updates

WAHVM-London-Whistlejacket_crop-words-v4The 41st Congress of the World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine (WAHVM) will be held at Imperial College London, UK from the 10th to 13th September 2014.  All official conference information can be found at http://www.veterinaryhistorylondon.com/

Registration and applications for bursaries are now open *until 18th August 2014*: registration payments cannot be accepted on the day of the conference.

Provisional program and timetable are now available.

 

Young Scholars Award Announcement 2014: First Prize 1000 Euro

Announcing the 2014 Young Scholars Award Competition

For the best original essay on any topic of relevance to the history of the veterinary field, including animal health and disease.

First Prize: 1000 Euro plus up to 1000 Euro expenses to present the paper at the Congress in London*

Second Prize: 400 Euro

Third Prize: 200 Euro

Deadline: 28 February 2014

Click on this link for details of the competition:   Young Scholars Comp London

WAHVM 2014 – Call for Papers

The call for papers is now available for the 41st International WAHVM Congress, which will be held at Imperial College, London, United Kingdom, 10-13 September 2014. The two conference themes are ‘the history of One Health’, and ‘war, animals and the veterinary profession.’ Papers and posters are invited on these and other topics relating to the history of animal health and veterinary medicine. Please submit an abstract using the form at www.veterinaryhistorylondon.com. The deadline is 31 Jan 2014. Students are particularly encouraged to participate, and bursaries are available for them.

Keynote speakers are:

Professor Donald Frederick Smith, Professor of Surgery and Dean Emeritus, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine: ‘The Three Parts of One Health’

Dr Hilda Kean, Ruskin College, Oxford: ‘Animals in wartime Britain: The Home Front’

The meeting is generously sponsored by: The Wellcome Trust, Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons Knowledge, Society for the Social History of Medicine, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Kings College London, University of Surrey School of Veterinary Medicine, The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies.

More information at www.veterinaryhistorylondon.com

Chicago, Illinois, USA 2013 AVMHS

 

Chicago skyline AVMA 2013Like everywhere, the history of veterinary medicine reflects the larger history of the United States. Sunday’s American Veterinary History Society meeting was a fascinating glimpse into several periods of US history through the lens of human-animal relationships and especially veterinary medicine. Here are a few highlights from my notes:

 

mjblackwell_125x150Michael Blackwell, dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Tennessee, gave a powerful lecture (much of it extemporaneous) on the participation of ethnic, cultural, and gender minorities in vet med over time. He asked, “why was veterinary medicine quiet during the Civil Rights era?” As with so many other important social institutions, he answered, our profession hoped that “if we were quiet, integration would not happen to us first.” Blackwell challenged the profession to become a leader in diversity, not just for the sake of diversity; but because of our role in the overall social good. Many animal-owning communities around the US feel alienated from the veterinary profession, due in part to the fact that they have not been historically represented in the profession. “We lose something when we don’t have a significant number in our profession of people from those communities we are trying to serve.” These communities have different cultural attitudes towards animals, and different levels of socioeconomic resources; but we all love our animals and want to care for them.

 

Cultural beliefs came up again in Kimberly Porter’s analysis of the “Cedar County Cow Wars.” This episode pitted angry farmers against government veterinarians mandated to test cattle for TB. Between about 1926 and 1931, this one county in the state of Iowa was consumed in hostilities over the meaning of “scientific” and the validity of the tuberculin test, the rights of individual animal owners versus the broader public health concerns of officials, and fears that traditional rural American culture was disappearing. Porter is the first historian I know of who has discovered the role of a radio “shock jock” named Norman Baker, who broadcast over the station “KTNT” under the banner of “The Naked Truth.” In the tradition of Billy Sunday and other inflammatory radio personalities, Baker classed meat packers, serum manufacturers, and government vets as the farmers’ enemy. Porter argues that Baker inflamed his radio audience, thus accounting for the fact that this was the only place in the US where violence accompanied TB testing to this degree (and where a lawsuit went all the way up to the US Supreme Court).

 

Cultural attitudes toward veterinarians and animals can be discerned from many sources: the postcards that Trenton Boyd has collected; the newspapers and radio broadcasts from the “cow wars,” the oral histories, published lectures and papers, photographs and adverts, …all of these sources and more were featured at the Sunday session. This was a great program of veterinary and animal history. More soon!